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Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)
religion correspondent lauren green is here next. it's a pig fight, a family forced out of their home over their pet. the controversy behind this coming up. ♪ [ male announcer ] in blind taste tests, even ragu users chose prego. prego?! but i've bought ragu for years. [ thinking ] wonder what other questionable choices i've made? i choose date number 2! whooo! [ sigh of relief ] [ male announcer ] choose taste. choose prego. [ sigh of relief ] all right that's a fifth-floor probleok.. not in my house! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! no no no! not today! ha ha ha! ha ha ha! jimmy how happy are folks who save hundreds of dollars switching to geico? happier than dikembe mutumbo blocking a shot. get happy. get geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more. >> welcome back. time for your shot of the morni morning. [cat meowing] >> cats and dogs calling a truce. and the cat is herding the puppies. >> in a reversal of the natural order, it's a cat herding puppies. >> clayton: amazing, one wary dog, i don't know about this, is he leading me into a trap. this video of course -- this video h
people from every walks of life and every religion and if they are willing to work hard they can success. that has to be more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syria situation but the moment of promise and danger in the arab world in north africa. >> thank you, mr. president. of mentioned the aftermath the assad regime. there's a lot of concern that the upheaval is creating extremism. how concerned are you that extremist could take over in syria and, perhaps worse than assad? usas hoping you could give an insight on how you brokered the call to netanyahu. and you have offered asylum that he rejected and does that offer still stand? thank you. >> well, i'm very concerned about syria becoming a place for extremists because extremists thrive in chaos. they thrive in failed states and in power vacuums. they don't have much to offer when it comes to building things but they are good about exploiting situations that, you know, are no longer functional. they fill that gap. that's why, i think it is so important for us to work with the international community to help accele
of life, every background, every religion. and if they've got a good idea and willing to work hard, they can succeed. and that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about not just you know in the syria situation, but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise but also danger in the arab world in north africa. >> julie. >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was also hoping you could give us some insight into how you brokered the call today between prime ministers and how much of their willingness to talk is actually driven by the urgency in syria. and, your majesty, you have offered assad asylum which he rejected, does that offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> well, i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremists because extremists thriv
of every walk of life. every background, every religion. if they've got a great idea and they're willing to work hard, they can succeed. that's got to be something that's more consistently spoken about. not just with respect to the syrian situation. but i think with respect to this enormous moment of both promise, but also danger in the arab world. and in north africa. julie pace? >> thank you, mr. president. you mentioned the aftermath of the assad regime. there's a lot of concern in jordan and elsewhere that the upheaval in syria is creating havens for extremism. how concerned are you at this point that extremists or jihadists could actually take over in syria and perhaps be even worse than assad? and i was hoping could give us insight on how you brokered the call between prime ministers erdogan and netenyahu and how much of their talk is driven by the urgency in syria. and your majesty, you've offered assad asylum, which he rejected. does the offer of asylum still stand? thank you. >> i am very concerned about syria becoming an enclave for extremism. because extremists thrive in chaos
by the public religion research institute finds almost two-thirds of all americans are in favor of a path to citizenship. though that number probably doesn't take into account the feelings of the 11 million undocumented americans. it also showed that 71% of americans favor a pathway and a robust 53% of republicans are in favor of one as well. which is all well and good. should we consider what immigrants think? we welcome the great writer who grew up in haiti and immigrated at age 12. she's written many beautiful novels and a book called create dangerously. the immigrant writer at work. she is a genius, certified. it is truly an honor to have you on the show. thank you very much. >> thank you so much for having me. i just remember you as such a novelist before. it has been great to see what's happened to you. >> now we're getting too much. your recent article, you talk about immigrants remain humane treatment. what do you mean? how do you define humane treatment? do you include a 13-year pathway as humane? >> well, humane treatment is basic. you have a detention system now where it is mos
are secular in their outlook, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond.
or break the electorate down by religion. for example, white evangelicals form a strong part of the republican party base. they are overwhelmingly opposed. but everybody else who is not a white evangelical christian by 20-plus points support freedom to marry. >> i want to go through some of these numbers that show the shift. some of them are in places we might think independents. but a lot of them are not. so, look, this is abc "washington post" polling. '04, 15% of republicans support gay marriage. now 33%, more than double, i'm not a math major but i think that's right. conservatives, 10% in '04 -- three times as much. and minorities, 28 -- this is remarkable and i think honestly, barack obama deserves a significant amount of credit for being an african-american president of the united states, supporting same-sex marriage. 28% in 2004. 61% now. alex, these changes, they're not just -- it's not democrats getting more in favor of it. here's the fundamental question. what does your party do? this is what we have been talking about. you have some people saying -- john huntsman,
time. i'm not accusing everybody who's against gay marriage as bigotry. it's true that some religions treat that, which may or may not be bigotry. >> this case is the fact that the equal protection clause will create a new class. >> that's the state of this country, and individuals have a right to be treated the same way as everybody else. and that is at the core of this debate. >> a tricky question. but it violates the equal protection clause. you have to create a new class of people. >> do we need more individual rights, or is this a question about marriage? those are two different -- they may be related, but they're two different things. >> that's a very important question. the question before the supreme court, regardless of who's changing their mind on it or whose loved one is gay. who among us doesn't have a loved one who's gay. that's a given. the question is whether the 14th amendment clause should create a new class of people? the supreme court hasn't done that in 30 years. >> it's about whether the equal protection clause protects people who have the right to marry. >> that'
, she spends a lot of time reminiscing and reflecting on the role of religion and it's very much an important piece for her. >> next up is nick in prince frederick, maryland, hi, nick. >> first of all, thank you for this great program. i'm glad you are part of it. we have links to louisa catherine here. her uncle was one of maryland's first governors. the most we have is what of our town centers, we have a plaque. and a book where you get an impression of louisa catherine that she is very involved in the politics of washington. you don't get the sense of whether it is just a surface or whether her words are contributing to the compromises that are made during that time. would you mind commenting on those two things? >> that is louisa catherine's birth family. in maryland? do you know of them? >> her family was from maryland. her father was born in maryland. that is very important because that is how she makes her claim that she is an american. i met the war in london, but my father is an american. her uncle was the first governor of maryland. so, she has an important connection w
, who believe that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. say and bewould necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. , andhere is this conflict ons conflict is not resolved the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult
of florida atlanta university. respects all religions and welcomes people of all faiths, background and beliefs. let us know what you think about this. you can weigh in on twitter. we are ff weekend and start using hash tag ff weekend so we can follow the conversation there this is how we follow it like this. >> alisyn: i understand. that makes perfect sense to me. meanwhile we have this fox news alert for you. because for the first time in four years. the u.s. senate has passed a budget. that's amazing. >> jessie: good job guys. >> the yeas are 50. the nays are 49. >> all nighter. voted on dozens of amendments in ending the passing with a judgment. elizabeth plan is live in washington with more. have you gotten any sleep? when you there watching the vote orama as they everywhere calling it? >> did i get a little bit of sleep it did take all night. with t. was a slow process. it is done. the senate approved the budget first time in four years. 3.7 trillion-dollar blueprint plan. the resolution raises nearly a trillion dollars in new taxes. it does so by closing some tax breaks for t
in their religion or in their experience, it is an extremely difficult thing to do. jon: marvin, i understand you can hear me now. >> i'm back. jon: good. >> i just answered his question. >> thank you very much. [laughter] jon: i have one for you, marvin, you you were saying the press should have been more skeptical. you had the director of the cia saying weapons of mass destruction a slam dunk in iraq, you had saddam apparently telling his own generals that he had weapons of mass destruction. you had colin powell going before the u.n. general assembly and saying, look, they've got all the parts and pieces they need to build weapons of mass destruction. how much more skeptical was the press supposed to be? >> well, you are setting up the bush administration's case for war in iraq. and the united states went to war in iraq. congress supported the president's policy on going to war, and the media supported it what this all adds up to, however, since it didn't work out that way, was that somebody got it drastically wrong. american intelligence got it wrong, the brits got it wrong, the israelis got i
. to stand with us on freedom of speech and freedom of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad
of its suffering, but also all of its salvation. it's a part of the three great religions, jud judiasm, christianity that trace their roots to abraham and has inspired communities across the globe, including me and my fellow americans. in the united states a nation made up of people who crossed oceans to start anew were actually drawn to the idea of finding freedom in our land. the african-americans, the story of the exodus was perhaps the central story, the most powerful image about emerging from the grip of bondage to reach for liberty and human dignity, a tale that was carried from savory through the civil rights movement into today. for generations this promise helped people weather poverty and persecution while holding onto the hope that a better day was on the horizon. for me personally growing up in far-flung parts of the world and without firm roots the store row spoke to a yearning for every human being for a home. even as we draw strength from god's will and the freedom expressed on pass over we also know that here on earth we must bear our responsibilities in an imperfect wo
and religion." we grant them power. we protect them. they do not make us free. as long as we have the second amendment, we always will be. ourre america and politicians are only as powerful as we the people will allow. the latest from the nra, again focusing on guns, background checks. a look at guns and video games in our country. of course, front and center, following what happened in newtown, conn. last december. the hearst newspaper focusing on all of these issues, this writing -- chronicle," exploring one aspect of our culture, the prevalence of violence in our media. read some of the opinions available online. a lot of people weighing in on all of this. brian joins us from sterling heights, michigan. morning. caller: how are you? host: fine, thank you. caller: excellent. video games, as long as a , let thes a scapegoat parents raise the kids. back in the 1980's and 1990's anytime someone killed someone they blamed metal music. it is the same thing here. someone was out, they start shooting at people -- people play video games. he played video games. that is what it is. no. it starts at
of religion and freedom of the press. secondly, it is the economics and the bonds that bind us together. the united states represent about one fourth of the world's gross domestic product. the nations of europe represent more. nato is about 50% of the gdp. it is $4 trillion per year across the atlantic. so i think the transatlantic connection has an important economic component as well. third, geography does matter. sometimes people say to me, they are the bastions of the cold war. i would counter by saying that it's not. they are forward operating bases in the 21st century. they allow us to extend support from eucom in that area as well. fourth, i would say that nato would serve together around the world is a wide variety of missions that we can talk about this morning. fifth and finally, nowhere else in the world will we find such an elite and capable group of allies who have the technology, the training, the levels to help us. we need to encourage our european partners to spend more on defense. i do that consistently, i'm glad to talk about that today. but i do believe these connecti
don't believe everything should be put up to a sproept freedom to speech, freedom of religion, freedom to smaer not something we take votes on. it belongs to all of us under the constitution and that is why we have court. >> freedom to marry belongs to everyone, but what marriage is, you're talking about redefining marriage. >> marriage is not defined by who's denied it. >> this isn't "cross fire." i want to end with you. go ahead. >> an odd way to think about constitutional law to sap that the court should refrain from deciding whether something is constitutional or not, even if it would be advantageous for the nation as a whole to have the conversation continue in politics. the court is a passive body. it doesn't get to decide whether to take a case, also doesn't get to decide once a case is befores it, granted review to punt on that case simply because the politician conversation vo continue. something is either constitutional or it's not. >> and they are constitution. >> it's difficult to predict what the high court lieutenant do -- will do in a case like this, based on obama care.
to their religion or ethnicity, are starting to push back in some instances. there is a great deal of concern. i want to assure you, i mentioned i have met people the pre syrian army, and we have highlighted the worries of minority groups and christians, not that we are against the sunni majority of syria. we are not. the minorities are nervous and there might -- their rights must be protected and respected. we hear good things from them. i can tell you for example that they have met christian leaders from some of the communities in syria and have told us afterwards that their meetings were populated. we have to keep pushing in that direction. >> thank you. if you could touch on the chemical weapons issues. was called a red line and there have been reports as recently in the last 24 hours about what is actually happening on the ground, whether they have been used, whether they will be used. if you could just talk about what the administration is doing to prevent the transfer of these weapons to groups. thank you. >> we viewed this issue with extreme seriousness. it is incredibly important to us.
. it's a cross section of race, religion, color, age, you know, from a 20-year-old to a 70-year-old. and everybody needs that truck. and it's such a -- you know, it's a metaphor for the american dream and survival of the fittest. it starts out absurd because you're like what's the sport, you go like this. but, you know, 16 hours into it, you just desperately want everyone to win that truck. >> so i was asking how you came up with this idea. you're like straight out of broadway. you're not straight out of broadway. how did this happen? how did you guys come together? >> we met through a mutual friend and started writing songs, just songs. >> oh, really? >> we actually live three blocks away from each other. >> oh, okay. that will do it. >> and we were having a great time writing songs and amanda asked me to join the team, the hardbody team and so off we went. >> what's it been like? >> it's been thrilling. >> i mean the difference especially from being in a band to now doing this? >> very different. well, it's been a roller coaster ride. it's a gigantic team of people working tog
that the separation of religion from the state is the salvation of the country, that is the natural ally of the united states, not the islamic side. i think there should be more support for the politics of secularism in iraq. it would not be wrong. in fact, i would say and be necessary and highly desirable for the americans to support their natural allies, which i happen to believe represent the future of iraq and i myself am part of, at a personal level. so, there is this conflict, and this conflict is not resolved on the boards. the outcome of this will depend on how much the united states is willing to put into the right factors to get iraq moving in the right direction. if they fail, it will be very unfortunate, but the people who will pay the price will be the people of iraq and american interests in the region. >> very quickly, the european perspective on the u.s.-iraq relationship. >> i think many people looking at that relationship feel that the u.s. wants to forget about iraq, start looking at it through the rearview mirror, look beyond. and people find that quite difficult to understand, aft
Search Results 0 to 24 of about 25 (some duplicates have been removed)